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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
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A Facebook post incites an IRL response by the citizens of Mendoza, Argentina’s wine country. The protests led to 80,000 signatures in support of the draft bills to ban fracking—and seven anti-fracking draft laws before the Argentine congress. Photo: via EcoLeaks

The First Eco-Leak

By Christopher Ketcham   |   Feb 13, 2019 February 13, 2019

In March 2018, using nothing more than a Facebook page and a rudimentary website, a 33-year-old Argentine-American biologist named Esteban Servat launched a protest that has mobilized tens of thousands of people in Argentina. Servat published a secret Argentine government study of the environmental effects of fracking in the mountainous… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Mountain Hollow Dreams

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Feb 11, 2019 February 11, 2019

“I’d built it up in my head a lot—being a professional climber. This felt like the consummation of those dreams. I found the valley, I envisioned the trip, I got the funding, made it happen, stood at the base, picked the line, climbed it, sent, we were at the top… Read More

Honored by Grove, Manley and Oliver as “the Old Friend,” this 8- to 10-foot bristlecone stands ragged without the protection of other trees nearby, most of its roots above  ground. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Trespassing

By Garrett Grove   |   Feb 6, 2019 February 6, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds 
 from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Core

By Taro Tamai   |   Feb 5, 2019 February 5, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

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Mars can wait. A sunset view of part of Massy’s farm, Severn Park, is a reminder that earthen beauty is a fringe benefit of regenerative agricultural practices. Photo: Trisha Dixon

A Blueprint for Cooling Earth

By Brad Wieners   |   Feb 4, 2019 February 4, 2019

When he was 22 and away at college, Charles Massy got a fateful shock: His father had suffered a severe heart attack, and while it wasn’t immediately fatal, it was clear his dad could no longer run the family farm back home in the Monaro region of New South Wales,… Read More

Microscope image shows a closer view of microfibers tested during the study. These tiny fibers that shed from garments over their lifetime are no larger than five millimeters. Photo: Mathew Watkins

Teaming Up to Get to the Bottom of Microfiber Pollution

By Stephen Chastain   |   Feb 1, 2019 February 1, 2019

Together with industry partners, Patagonia commissioned Ocean Wise’s Plastic Lab to investigate microfibers, the tiny textile particles that shed from garments over their lifetime. The scientists at the Plastic Lab have just completed the first phase of this research project, so we asked them for an update. While plastic debris… Read More

Leah Evans approaching a cedar “mother tree” at the bottom of the Womb, a slide path off Mount Macpherson near Revelstoke, British Columbia. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard has helped us understand that mother trees send nutrients to the surrounding forest, increasing the resilience of an entire network of trees. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Homegrown

By Leah Evans   |   Jan 31, 2019 January 31, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Most trees in Japanese public spaces are highly manicured from the beginning of their life to craft a distinct aesthetic, like this intricate pine entanglement in the Yamagata Prefecture. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Film

By Molly Baker   |   Jan 29, 2019 January 29, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Year of Big Ideas 2019

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Jan 22, 2019 January 22, 2019

“For better or for worse, ideas are infectious. They become our goals, and the struggle to realize them becomes memory, the story of our lives,” says Fitz Cahall. When Brian O’Dell decided it was time to stop driving his Honda Civic, he didn’t list in on Craigslist. Instead, he posted… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Hit Pause

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Jan 17, 2019 January 17, 2019

What if you could hit pause on life? This last year, Fitz turned 40. Instead of buying a sports car, Fitz took a sabbatical. Today, he presents a story about mountain biking the Oregon Timber Trail, a 670-mile-long, mostly single track trail across the state’s deserts and forests. What’s the… Read More

Will it go? Ian Cooper (left) and Robbie Phillips scope the terrain above. When every pitch on a route requires something different than all the others, planning and creativity are crucial. Photo: Drew Smith

A Very Real Possibility

By Robbie Phillips   |   Jan 15, 2019 January 15, 2019

On establishing a route in Cochamó Valley that might be too hard—but might not. It often blows me away, the apparent randomness that sets the paths leading us through life. Just over a year ago, a friend of mine met Crispin Waddie while working on an oil rig in the… Read More

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