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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
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Instead of feeding on whitebark pine nuts and army cutworm moths in the alpine country, grizzlies are beginning to stay low in Montana’s Mission Valley throughout summer and into fall gorging themselves on the abundant crops planted at the base of the mountains. Courtesy Bryce Andrews

Grizzlies in August

By Bryce Andrews   |   Jul 3, 2019 July 3, 2019

This was the rule of late summer in Montana’s Mission Valley: During the day, the landscape belonged to humans. Tractors worked the fields, and children played carefree in the yards. People swam in shady eddies and picnicked beside the creeks. At night, the bears came out. Stretching in the cooling… Read More

Barreling rights at King Island’s unspoiled Martha Lavinia Beach. The construction of a largescale fish 
 arm just offshore would immediately degrade this intact ecosystem—and likely impact the perfect peaks of Martha’s. Photo: Ted Grambeau

Worth Protecting

By Sean Doherty   |   Jun 28, 2019 June 28, 2019

Standing Up Against Industrial Fish Farming That Would Forever Alter A Unique Australian Beachbreak The day we arrived on King Island we drove out to Martha Lavinia Beach, where we stood in the dunes and watched waves running down the beach—long left-handers breaking so fast they were almost impossible to… Read More

In front of a jump-off rock aptly named Life and Death, Dan Ross puts a new 5'9

Open Ocean, Open Mind

By Sean Doherty   |   Jun 24, 2019 June 24, 2019

At Fletcher Chouinard Designs, the focus is on durable, high-performing equipment that lets you have fun no matter what the ocean is doing. There are never enough hours in a day for Fletcher Chouinard. As a surfer, shaper, kiteboarder and new father, he was really doing the dance. Then along… Read More

”There’s nothing like having a sisterhood of women who love you and support you unconditionally. No matter what happens they’ll always be there, reminding me to follow my heart. It’s hard to describe how empowering it is to have such dynamic, powerful women in my life who want to lift me up into the best version of myself.” —Liz Clark. Photo: Justin Turkowski

Sea Sisters

By Kimi Werner   |   Jun 19, 2019 June 19, 2019

The Best Times Are About Friends, Not Perfection It had been four years since Liz Clark, Léa Brassy and I first spent time together, on a sailing trip through the Tuamotus. We knew we’d found something special from the moment we… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

One Year for the Blue Heart of Europe

By Lisa Rose   |   Jun 20, 2019 June 20, 2019

The Vjosa River flows 270 kilometers without barriers from the Pindus Mountains to the Adriatic Sea. It’s one of many rivers in the Balkans that are under threat by a tidal wave of more than 2,800 new hydropower dam projects. In March 2018, Patagonia joined grassroots groups and regional community… Read More

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After months of restoration work, the 45-foot canoe U’i undergoes precise measurement during the waterline test that confirmed she was ready to race once more. Ke’ehi Lagoon, Hawai’i. Photo: John Bilderback

Labor of Love

By Ben Wilkinson   |   Jun 17, 2019 June 17, 2019

Restoring a traditional Hawaiian koa canoe. Ka Wahine u‘i O Hale‘iwa, which roughly translates to “Beautiful Young Woman of Hale‘iwa,” is the pride and joy of the Manu O Ke Kai Canoe Club here in Hale‘iwa on the North Shore of O‘ahu. Carved from a single koa tree, U‘i’s life… Read More

The US recycling collection rate for plastic bottles is less than 30 percent. These bottles are among the lucky few that made it to a recycling facility to be melted down and turned into recycled polyester gear. This fall season, 69% of Patagonia’s line, by weight, will be derived from recycled materials. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

What We’re Doing About Our Plastic Problem

By Patagonia   |   Jun 13, 2019 June 13, 2019

Our home planet has a deeply disturbing and pervasive problem with plastics. In April, a group of researchers studying the deepest part of the ocean—the Mariana Trench—discovered plastic bags and candy wrappers floating nearly seven miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean. Globally, about 450 million metric tons of plastic are produced every… Read More

Levi Ginnis Jr. scouts the area along the Yukon River in search of moose. The hunt and the stories of Gwich'in families taking a stand to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are the main focus of the film Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee. Photo: Greg Balkin

Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee

By Madalina Preda   |   Jun 10, 2019 June 10, 2019

Indigenous communities across the United States are increasingly confronted with threats to their sovereignty and to the places they rely on for their culture and way of life. Nowhere is this threat felt more than in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. A new short film, Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee, looks at the… Read More

Anne Gilbert Chase and Brittany Griffith get the beta on Alam Kuh from Iranian climbers Habibi and Sholmaz, friends and partners from Tabriz. During our time at base camp, we got to know Habibi, Sholmaz and many other Iranian climbers, who would come by our camp to welcome us to Iran and the Alborz Mountains, and to talk about climbing, life and politics. We were a fascinating anomaly, but being climbers made us break that down. Photo: Beth Wald

Finding Refuge in Iran

By Beth Wald   |   May 29, 2019 May 29, 2019

Fog from the distant Caspian Sea swirled around us as we left the road, crossed a narrow mountain stream on a rickety footbridge of wornwooden planks, passed a pungent corral full of dank, scruffy sheep, and started the steep climb to Alam Kuh base camp in the Alborz mountain range… Read More

Spring time in the Sierra. Photo: Christian Pondella

The Sierra Snow Wolf

By Max Hammer   |   May 24, 2019 May 24, 2019

On the west face of Mount Whitney, just off the summit of the highest peak in the lower 48, we had to traverse right. For us skiers it was no real issue, a bit of sidestepping and poling would do the trick. Yet, our group was comprised of both two… Read More

From the Fall 1984 catalog, Julie Galton and friends show off their brightly colored Baggies after rolling around in a patch of mud by the Colorado River. Photo: Chris Brown

Under the Mud

By Rachel G. Horn   |   May 14, 2019 May 14, 2019

Julie Galton hadn’t been to a Patagonia store in years when she realized she needed some new Baggies™ for her upcoming summer trip to the Colorado River with her son. But when she went to Patagonia.com to grab a few pairs, she was unexpectedly greeted by a familiar face. Hers. It was the only… Read More

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