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A Measure of Hope Read More

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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
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“Somehow, the desert would always remain in the recesses of my mind—that project I’d get to the next season, that crack we scoped that we needed to get anchors on or sometimes just that meditation and erasing of anything from the past or present.” -Luke Mehall, The Desert. Photo: Greg Cairns

The Magic of the Desert

By Luke Mehall   |   Aug 23, 2019 August 23, 2019

The creation of Bears Ears National Monument was something that seemed more inevitable in the summer of 2016. It seems like now it’s one of those things where you’re on one side or the other because after all, I’m writing this book in the Trump years, and… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Fistful of Hearts

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Aug 22, 2019 August 22, 2019

“We biked through wind, rain, and snow. If lightning struck, we kept going. We only stopped if it got too close.  We outran tornadoes in Oklahoma. We waited out a storm in an old horse barn in Montana, huddled like penguins, our bikes cast carelessly aside in the mud,” writes… Read More

John “The Blind Woodsman” Furniss knows exactly where everything is in his Washougal, Washington, workshop. He also owns a T-shirt that says, “You will have to speak up. I’m blind.” Photo: Anni Furniss

Sawdust Is My Glitter

By Jeff McElroy   |   Aug 21, 2019 August 21, 2019

Editor’s note: This post discusses anxiety and suicide. In a humble workshop in Washougal, Washington, a blind craftsman holds a locally harvested log that he has made into a blank with his miter saw. He turns it in his hands to feel its shape and weight. He measures and marks,… Read More

The Elwha River has been dam-free for less than two decades  whereas the Hoh River—running from the flanks of Mount Olympus to the Pacific Ocean on the Olympic Peninsula’s western edge—remains one of the state’s few uninterrupted rivers, largely due to its location in Olympic National Park. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Saving One River: Hoh Steelhead in Decline

By Colin Wiseman   |   Aug 17, 2019 August 17, 2019

“Nature provides a free lunch, but only if we control our appetites.” —William Ruckelshaus, first administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency A coho salmon the size of my pinky drifts quietly in the shade. It’s hardly distinguishable from the sand below. But Marie-France Roy, a professional… Read More

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Across the valley from the 18 Road trail system—home of the ultra-iconic Zippity Do Dah —is Kokopelli’s  Trail, another Fruita classic. Mary’s Loop is just a part of the loop, but the views of the Colorado River make it a standout, especially at sunset. Photo: Carl Zoch

“Life of Pie”: Jen Zeuner and Anne Keller Q&A

By Katie Klingsporn   |   Aug 15, 2019 August 15, 2019

In a fossil-rich corner of western Colorado, set against lush agricultural fields, the big-box stores of Grand Junction and the sandstone formations of the Colorado National Monument, you’ll find Fruita. These days, the town is an international mountain-biking destination known for its ribbony, high-desert trails, technical routes overlooking the Colorado… Read More

This illustration by Matt Blease appears in full in the Patagonia August 2019 Gear Guide.

Recycling Is Broken. Now What?

By Michele Bianchi   |   Aug 14, 2019 August 14, 2019

Patagonia is no stranger to the difficulty of throwing stuff away. We take back 100 percent of the gear you return for recycling through our Worn Wear program. In 2018, we recycled 6,797 pounds of products. But we can’t recycle or repair everything you send us. Some… Read More

Krissy Moehl and Grant Guise run the inaugural takayna / Tarkine ultramarathon. Photo: Jarrah Lynch

If You Love It, Run for It

By Krissy Moehl   |   Aug 13, 2019 August 13, 2019

Krissy Moehl reports from the inaugural takayna ultramarathon “There are no footprints.” Fellow Patagonia ambassador and New Zealand native Grant Guise voiced what I was thinking. Our headlamps and phone lights dimly illuminated the overgrown double-track from Rebecca Road. “If 100 people are starting a race in five minutes, we… Read More

“I was just about to get speared when Tom Hannagan, from Friends of Ironwood Forest, whipped out a metal comb he always carries with him to brush cactus barbs away. We had the best time there with Tom and Dave Barker from Friends. We laughed a lot, and their love of the area and the time they spent hiking with us made it a really memorable trip.” —Maya Nerenberg, Size and Fit Specialist. Photo: Geoff Holstad

Designers at Work

By Malcolm Johnson   |   Jul 30, 2019 July 30, 2019

Lately, the future of America’s public lands has been very much on our minds. There’s been a bit of good news, but mostly no end to the threats to public lands and waters and disruptive changes coming out of Washington, DC. Read More

Five-thirty a.m. looking good from my tent the second morning of GoWild 2018. Photo: Kirsten Van Horne

Growing Pains

By Kirsten Van Horne   |   Jul 17, 2019 July 17, 2019

 In our 1990 summer catalog we said, “It’s up to us to make sure that children don’t go tree hungry, that they have wild places and opportunities to be in them. Once they do, they will amaze us with their caring. They need not wait to grow up to be… Read More

The first wildlife overpass put in on the People’s Way Partnership project along Highway 93 in Montana. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes declared that the highway was a visitor on the landscape and any future improvements needed to consider the need of wildlife first. In this spirit, the tribes worked closely with the Montana Department of Transportation and created the densest collection of wildlife crossing structures in North America. Bears, deer, elk, bobcats and others are already using the structures. Photo: Steven Gnam

A Measure of Hope

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Jul 16, 2019 July 16, 2019

As the great Aldo Leopold once said, harmony with the land and with wildlife “is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.” Yet here we are: humankind is now the singular driving force behind the potential extinction of more than one… Read More

The last straw. Meredith Wiltsie wiring the damn muffler en route to the Ruby Mountains, Nevada. Photo: Gordon Wiltsie

Where He Landed (on Mars)

By Bonnie Tsui   |   Jul 15, 2019 July 15, 2019

Rule #1 of a road trip: Vehicle may break down. Rule #2 of a road trip: You may break down along with it. Near the Ruby Mountains in Nevada, Gordon and Meredith Wiltsie were struggling with wrenches and wire after the muffler came loose on their old International Travelall. As… Read More

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