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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
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Grandson Braden steered the longest crossing of the 2017 trip, from O‘ahu to Kaua‘i. Photo: ©Holopuni Va‘a, by Wim Lippens

A Thirty-Five-Year Voyage Back In Time

By Nick Beck   |   Feb 23, 2018 February 23, 2018

In May 1981, I set out in a home-built Hawaiian sailing canoe from South Point on the island of Hawai‘i to my home on Kaua‘i. It was an adventure that would take me from the southern-most to the northern-most point of the Hawaiian Islands. I named my canoe Holopuni, “to… Read More

Building friendships without language, Tibetan and American musicians bond at an ancient monastery on the Daqu River. Photo: @tripjenningsvideo

Beyond Words: Singing for a National Park in China

By Kai Welch   |   Jun 28, 2018 June 28, 2018

Words often fail us. If their basic goal is to generate understanding between human beings, let’s face it: they fall short with epidemic frequency. News headlines around the world are riddled with conflicts that are caused by the breakdown of communication and the inability to compassionately understand differences. This thought… Read More

Photo: Mikey Schaefer

The Magic of Yosemite National Park

By Timmy O’Neill   |   Sep 16, 2016 September 16, 2016

The national park system may not have saved my life but it definitely allowed me to truly discover and continually define it. Following an abysmal 13th grade at an entry level university and an equally lamentable year employed in one of the most dangerous professions, I bolted west to manifest… Read More

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Photo: Nadine Lehner

Paving the Brooks Range

By Nadine Lehner   |   Sep 19, 2017 September 19, 2017

“We were so hungry, we licked the margarine wrappers.” In the summer of 1975, my father and his two brothers loaded into an old truck and headed for Alaska, a fabled land for a teenage troupe of New England climbers. A mentor had shown them a faded photograph of the… Read More

Photo: Peter Doucette

And Then There Were Two

By Majka Burhardt   |   Jul 25, 2017 July 25, 2017

Dear Kaz and Irenna, Today you are 10-months old. This week, the last of winter’s snow left our garden, and the final crocus patch bloomed and closed just in time to escape your attempts to eat its purple petals. I spent our first winter together pulling you behind me in… Read More

The US recycling collection rate for plastic bottles is less than 30 percent. These bottles are among the lucky few that made it to a recycling facility to be melted down and turned into recycled polyester gear. This fall season, 69% of Patagonia’s line, by weight, will be derived from recycled materials. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

What We’re Doing About Our Plastic Problem

By Patagonia   |   Jun 13, 2019 June 13, 2019

Our home planet has a deeply disturbing and pervasive problem with plastics. In April, a group of researchers studying the deepest part of the ocean—the Mariana Trench—discovered plastic bags and candy wrappers floating nearly seven miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean. Globally, about 450 million metric tons of plastic are produced every… Read More

Photo: Eugénie Frerichs

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

By Patagonia   |   Feb 9, 2018 February 9, 2018

Back in November, a group of Patagonia employees and friends from around the country came together in Yosemite National Park to have some important and difficult conversations about diversity, equity and inclusion. The bottom line: We can, and should, be doing a lot more to actively engage with individuals and… Read More

Illustration: Stephen Rockwood

Back Door to Baker

By Krissy Moehl   |   Aug 31, 2018 August 31, 2018

On clear days in the Pacific Northwest, views of Mount Baker depend on the marine layer and the storms. The 10,781-foot snowcapped dome is often obscured by the shifting weather, and though I’d grown up looking at the mountain, I didn’t see it much this year. But when Jeremy Wolf… Read More

It's not hard to see why Cochamó Valley is often compared to Yosemite. Photo: Drew Smith

Coming to Bat for Cochamó

By Chris Kalman   |   Oct 5, 2018 October 5, 2018

What can I say about Cochamó that hasn’t already been said of a thousand other places before? It’s beautiful, it’s magical, it’s special? How about this: We haven’t messed it up yet. There are lots of beautiful, magical, special places in the world. What we humans tend to do when… Read More

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