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In 2008 the National Forest Service designated the upper part of the Path of the Pronghorn migration route as the country’s first designated wildlife corridor. The Wildlife Corridors Conservation Act seeks to build on this legacy. Photo: Joe Riis
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While exploring the reef, Belinda Baggs and Kimi Werner were surprised by the sudden appearance of a young humpback whale. Photo: Jarrah Lynch

The Reef Beneath

By Wayne Lynch   |   May 9, 2018 May 9, 2018

You know, it’s strange, you grow up as a kid in Australia and you see all these photos of the Great Barrier Reef and you hear all about it, and you feel you have some understanding or knowledge about the reef, but until you actually go up there and see… Read More

”There’s nothing like having a sisterhood of women who love you and support you unconditionally. No matter what happens they’ll always be there, reminding me to follow my heart. It’s hard to describe how empowering it is to have such dynamic, powerful women in my life who want to lift me up into the best version of myself.” —Liz Clark. Photo: Justin Turkowski

Sea Sisters

By Kimi Werner   |   Jun 19, 2019 June 19, 2019

The Best Times Are About Friends, Not Perfection It had been four years since Liz Clark, Léa Brassy and I first spent time together, on a sailing trip through the Tuamotus. We knew we’d found something special from the moment we… Read More

Massacre Rim Widerness Study Area. Photo: Kurt Kuznicki

Nevada’s Darkest Treasure

By Shaaron Netherton   |   Oct 22, 2018 October 22, 2018

The Massacre Rim towers 1,000 feet above Long Valley in the vast reaches of northwestern Nevada. As with most hikes in this part of the world, getting to the top requires picking out an unmarked route, being flexible and overcoming obstacles. Halfway up, after skirting yet another talus field, sharp… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Growing Down

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Jan 2, 2018 January 2, 2018

I’ve watched my friends and peers hopscotch across the world. Some of them have reached the top of their craft, authored ridiculous lines up mountains, followed rivers into wrinkles of the deepest canyons, found the edge of human endurance. If I look back on the last ten years, I’m often… Read More

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Kelly, telepathically dictating to his laptop back down in town, and I on the train up to the reception. Photo: Jen Olson

The 48-Hour Dress

By Brittany Griffith   |   Jul 15, 2011 July 15, 2011

As the sun heated up our little apartment, I drifted out of my dream and awoke to a bizarre scene: people sprawled all over the floor, futon and tiny twin beds…I could hear chatter in half a dozen languages, clinking plates and glasses… the faint smell of tobacco, espresso and… Read More

Photo: Peter Mather

In the Land of the Wolverine

By Tom Glass   |   Jun 19, 2018 June 19, 2018

Thumping along a frozen river by snowmachine, I’m winding my way into the heart of the Brooks Range in Northern Alaska. Riding snowmachines is a surprisingly busy activity, weight constantly shifting, eyes staring hard into the flat light, and today my decadent wrapping of goose down and full-face helmet with… Read More

Sean Villanueva O’Driscoll works a tricky dihedral on the first ascent of El Regalo de Mwono in Torres del Paine, Patagonia. Photo: Nicolas Favresse

Unstuck in Baffin Island’s Stewart Valley

By Nico Favresse   |   Jan 12, 2018 January 12, 2018

Pain pulses in my right foot to the rhythm of my heartbeats. I know something’s wrong, but the only option is to ignore it. The swelling presses against my shoe, but I’m afraid if I take it off, I’ll never get it back on. Still, I feel like I can’t… Read More

Most trees in Japanese public spaces are highly manicured from the beginning of their life to craft a distinct aesthetic, like this intricate pine entanglement in the Yamagata Prefecture. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Film

By Molly Baker   |   Jan 29, 2019 January 29, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Sonnie and his family in Yosemite, one of countless stops they’ll make over the course of their year on the road. Photo: Sonnie Trotter

The Only Constant Is Change

By Sonnie Trotter   |   Jul 12, 2018 July 12, 2018

I’m sitting on a sunny bench in some random park in central Oregon holding my eight-month-old daughter in my arms and watching my four-year-old son launch himself down a slide. We’ve been on the road as a family for nearly a month now, and the daily hunt for a decent… Read More

A wild female Chinook salmon surges upstream toward the spawning grounds. Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Photo: Eiko Jones

What’s a Fish Eater to Do?

By Langdon Cook   |   Apr 24, 2019 April 24, 2019

When Kevin Davis was a kid growing up in southeast Louisiana, recycling meant filling the pickup with trash and driving down to the river to dump it. Just the same, he and his neighbors had a reverence for the wild. “We prided ourselves on being hunter-gatherers,” he says. He’d bring… Read More

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