The Cleanest Line

Footprint Chronicles

In 1987, a barge named Mobro carried 3,100 tons of Islip Town and New York City trash at sea for over two months and about 6,000 miles, looking for a dumpsite. Thirty-two years later, the large problem of where to ship it all continues. Photo: Dennis Capolongo

Letter from Tuscany (Where We Get Our Used Wool)

By Madalina Preda   |   Aug 28, 2019 August 28, 2019

Silvia Micheloni cuts the plastic straps binding a bale of compacted used wool clothes that have already been sorted by color—today, she’s working through the greens. As she snips the last strap, dark green fabric of different shapes and sizes spills onto the factory floor. Her son Gabriele sprays them… Read More

The US recycling collection rate for plastic bottles is less than 30 percent. These bottles are among the lucky few that made it to a recycling facility to be melted down and turned into recycled polyester gear. This fall season, 69% of Patagonia’s line, by weight, will be derived from recycled materials. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

What We’re Doing About Our Plastic Problem

By Patagonia   |   Jun 13, 2019 June 13, 2019

Our home planet has a deeply disturbing and pervasive problem with plastics. In April, a group of researchers studying the deepest part of the ocean—the Mariana Trench—discovered plastic bags and candy wrappers floating nearly seven miles below the surface of the Pacific Ocean. Globally, about 450 million metric tons of plastic are produced every… Read More

Growing hemp is easy. This fibrous plant needs no pesticides or irrigation and requires low quantities of fertilizer. But turning hemp into fabric is a complicated task that requires an expertise American farmers will need to regain. Photo: Lloyd Belcher

Hemp Is Back

By Diane French   |   May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019

It’s hard not to notice the hype around hemp today. Pick up any lifestyle magazine, enter a pharmacy, talk to a health-food store employee or just the person next to you in yoga class—at some point you’ll learn about its miraculous powers. In particular, near-unbelievable claims swirl around cannabidiol, or… Read More

Microscope image shows a closer view of microfibers tested during the study. These tiny fibers that shed from garments over their lifetime are no larger than five millimeters. Photo: Mathew Watkins

Teaming Up to Get to the Bottom of Microfiber Pollution

By Stephen Chastain   |   Feb 1, 2019 February 1, 2019

Together with industry partners, Patagonia commissioned Ocean Wise’s Plastic Lab to investigate microfibers, the tiny textile particles that shed from garments over their lifetime. The scientists at the Plastic Lab have just completed the first phase of this research project, so we asked them for an update. While plastic debris… Read More

Thirty-five-year-old mother of three Adriana Robles has been working at Vertical Knits, a Fair Trade Certified™ garment factory in Baca, Yucatan, Mexico, since 2012. Photo: James Rodriguez

Giving Workers More of a Voice

By Rachel G. Horn   |   Nov 23, 2018 November 23, 2018

Behind everything we make is the hard work of a human being—from growing raw materials and weaving fabric to cutting and sewing the finished product. Yet those who work in garment factories—and, globally, more than 60 million people do—have historically been subject to substandard working conditions and unable to report… Read More

Photo: Wendy Savage

Celebrate Wool Times

By Patagonia   |   Jun 14, 2018 June 14, 2018

In 2015, we made the conscious decision to put a pause on our wool sourcing “until we can assure our customers of a verifiable process that ensures the humane treatment of animals.” We are happy to have accomplished our goal and to update you that as of… Read More

Three generations of organic advocates: Anais Beddard, a 29 year-old farmer who runs Lady Moon Farms; Eliot Coleman, the 78-year-old pioneer who helped the USDA write its first report on organic farming 37 years ago; and 92-year-old Emily Dale who attributes her long life and health to eating organic food. Photo courtesy of Keep the Soil in Organic

The Night They Drove Organic Down

By Dave Chapman   |   Nov 20, 2017 November 20, 2017

Looking back on the USDA meeting in Jacksonville, I am left with anger, grief and a sense of urgency that we keep moving forward. The meeting of the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) was an historical turning point for the National Organic Program (NOP). Read More

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