The Cleanest Line

Food

Safety first. Theatrics aside, Carston always wears goggles when bottling the spicier of his sauces—wisdom gained after accidentally squirting some in his eye. Photo: Mary McIntyre

Hurts So Good

By Sakeus Bankson   |   Nov 18, 2019 November 18, 2019

As seen in the November 2019 Journal. For the recipe behind Carston’s Spicy Magic Sauce, scroll to the end of the story. Although my tongue felt as if it might melt, Carston Oliver assured me I was not, in fact, going to die. “That’s just the capsaicin,”… Read More

Fifth-generation Nebraskan farmer Del Ficke converted his operation to no till in 1986. A year later, every farm within 10 miles followed suit. Courtesy Del Ficke

Don’t Till on Me

By Andrew O’Reilly   |   Oct 17, 2019 October 17, 2019

Del Ficke is a soil junkie. “It’s like a drug the first time you feel real good soil,” he says. “You get it in your hands and can feel how good it is. You can smell it and taste it. You just want to take a big old hit of… Read More

Located in a stunning, glacially-forged valley in southwest Iceland, the Laxá in Kjós is considered one of the best small salmon streams in the world. The wild Atlantic salmon, sea trout and views, however, are anything but diminutive. Photo: Oskar Sveinsson

The Final Frontier for Wild Atlantic Salmon

By Madalina Preda   |   Sep 4, 2019 September 4, 2019

In the last 20 years, the expansion of salmon farming in open-net pens has led to the loss of half the wild salmon population in Norway. On average, 200,000 farmed fish escape from open-net pens and many of them swim up rivers in Norway and breed with… Read More

Barreling rights at King Island’s unspoiled Martha Lavinia Beach. The construction of a largescale fish 
 arm just offshore would immediately degrade this intact ecosystem—and likely impact the perfect peaks of Martha’s. Photo: Ted Grambeau

Worth Protecting

By Sean Doherty   |   Jun 28, 2019 June 28, 2019

Standing Up Against Industrial Fish Farming That Would Forever Alter A Unique Australian Beachbreak The day we arrived on King Island we drove out to Martha Lavinia Beach, where we stood in the dunes and watched waves running down the beach—long left-handers breaking so fast they were almost impossible to… Read More

A wild female Chinook salmon surges upstream toward the spawning grounds. Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Photo: Eiko Jones

What’s a Fish Eater to Do?

By Langdon Cook   |   Apr 24, 2019 April 24, 2019

When Kevin Davis was a kid growing up in southeast Louisiana, recycling meant filling the pickup with trash and driving down to the river to dump it. Just the same, he and his neighbors had a reverence for the wild. “We prided ourselves on being hunter-gatherers,” he says. He’d bring… Read More

Joseph Kibiwott and Jim Barngrover of Montana-based Timeless Seeds inspect the roots of a lentil plant for nodules that indicate nitrogen fixation, which helps the plant grow and fertilize soil. Photo: Amy Kumler

Farming Down

By Liz Carlisle   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

The promise of regenerative organic agriculture. “The problem is that we’re all taught to farm up,” David Oien says, leading me into a field of low-growing plants that I will later learn to recognize as lentils. I try to think of what alternative there might be to farming upward. Outward?… Read More

Mars can wait. A sunset view of part of Massy’s farm, Severn Park, is a reminder that earthen beauty is a fringe benefit of regenerative agricultural practices. Photo: Trisha Dixon

A Blueprint for Cooling Earth

By Brad Wieners   |   Feb 4, 2019 February 4, 2019

When he was 22 and away at college, Charles Massy got a fateful shock: His father had suffered a severe heart attack, and while it wasn’t immediately fatal, it was clear his dad could no longer run the family farm back home in the Monaro region of New South Wales,… Read More

The biointensive garden at Parque Patagonia in summer, from above. More than 30 different crops in an orchestra of flavors. Photo: James Q Martin

The Garden at the End of the World

By Javier Soler   |   Sep 11, 2018 September 11, 2018

If the present status-quo of soil loss, carbon pollution and planetary warming continue, we’re looking at just 60 more harvests before we can no longer grow 95 percent of the food we humans rely upon to live. At the same time, the way to prevent this calamity is at hand:… Read More

Photo: Darcy Turenne

The Organism that Might Just Save the Planet

By Paul Greenberg   |   Aug 6, 2018 August 6, 2018

When you sit down to write an eye-catching essay about seafood, your first instinct is to go with one of the sleek and sexy creatures that have historically captured the human imagination. Salmon battling 20-knot currents to reach their spawning grounds at the headwaters of the world’s mightiest rivers. Bluefin… Read More

Filleting the catch of the day. Photo: Dave McCoy

The Freedom to Live Off the Land

By Mike Wood   |   Jun 7, 2018 June 7, 2018

When I was a kid, the Connecticut River was my Yukon. I spent many days working alongside the river or canoeing its islands and backwaters in search of crabs, snapper, blues, ducks and alewives—amazing silvery fish that brave the depths of the Atlantic to feed and grow and then return… Read More

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