The Cleanest Line

Culture

Building friendships without language, Tibetan and American musicians bond at an ancient monastery on the Daqu River. Photo: @tripjenningsvideo

Beyond Words: Singing for a National Park in China

By Kai Welch   |   Jun 28, 2018 June 28, 2018

Words often fail us. If their basic goal is to generate understanding between human beings, let’s face it: they fall short with epidemic frequency. News headlines around the world are riddled with conflicts that are caused by the breakdown of communication and the inability to compassionately understand differences. This thought… Read More

Caught by the heavy winds of a fast-moving South Pacific squall, Liz Clark heads to the mast to put another reef in Swell’s sail. Photo: Tahui Tufaimea

High Voltage

By Liz Clark   |   Mar 26, 2018 March 26, 2018

After an hour’s sleep, I wake to the sound of fat raindrops pelting the deck. The noise quickly escalates into a deafening torrent, and I push up off the settee and climb up the steps. Glancing at the radar screen on my way up, I see a massive squall blacking… Read More

Grandson Braden steered the longest crossing of the 2017 trip, from O‘ahu to Kaua‘i. Photo: ©Holopuni Va‘a, by Wim Lippens

A Thirty-Five-Year Voyage Back In Time

By Nick Beck   |   Feb 23, 2018 February 23, 2018

In May 1981, I set out in a home-built Hawaiian sailing canoe from South Point on the island of Hawai‘i to my home on Kaua‘i. It was an adventure that would take me from the southern-most to the northern-most point of the Hawaiian Islands. I named my canoe Holopuni, “to… Read More

The White Nile River, a tributary of the Nile, flows through Uganda. Photo: Eli Reichman

A Displaced Spirit

By Chandra Brown   |   Dec 21, 2017 December 21, 2017

When the Bujagali dam was erected on Uganda’s White Nile in 2011, the World Bank hired local witch doctors to relocate the river’s spirit gods. The deities that dwell in the Nile’s massive rapids were moved to cataracts on different, unaffected stretches of the river. This struck me as remarkable:… Read More

Photo: John Bilderback

In Their Wake: A Journey From Tahiti to Hawai‘i

By Ka‘iulani Murphy   |   Jun 9, 2017 June 9, 2017

I wipe tears from my cheek just as an electrical charge pulses through my body. My eyes are immediately drawn to a blue streak of light that flashes between my bicep and forearm. I let go of the mast cleat and exchange puzzled glances with fellow crewmembers. An ear-piercing clap… Read More

Students from Patagonia, Chile, and the Klamath River Basin form long-lasting bonds while confronting the challenges and joys of paddling 120 miles of the Klamath River. Photo: Ben Lehman

From Ríos to Rivers: Two Worlds United for the People of the River!

By Juanita Ringeling Vicuña   |   Dec 18, 2017 December 18, 2017

At first glimpse, the Klamath River in the United States’ Pacific Northwest and the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia, South America, seem to have nothing in common. Separated by more than 10,000 miles, their waters drain basins that are drastically different. One river begins in a sagebrush desert before weaving… Read More

Photo: John Bilderback

Mālama Honua: Hōkūle‘a’s Voyage of Hope – Part 4, Right Direction

By Nainoa Thompson   |   Mar 28, 2017 March 28, 2017

Since Hōkūleʻa was launched in 1975, we’ve seen that this magical vessel has the power to connect, inspire and transform communities and people. Carried upon her decks, Pacific peoples have revived the art and science of celestial navigation, wayfinding and deep-ocean voyaging that lay dormant for 600 years. Read More

Photo: Chuck Pratt

Remembering Royal Robbins 1935–2017

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Mar 20, 2017 March 20, 2017

Everyone in the Patagonia family is saddened to hear about the passing of Royal Robbins on March 14, 2017. Some in the company knew him personally, many of us did not. But we are, to this day, greatly inspired by his pioneering spirit and commitment to clean climbing. Read More

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