The Cleanest Line

Culture

After months of restoration work, the 45-foot canoe U’i undergoes precise measurement during the waterline test that confirmed she was ready to race once more. Ke’ehi Lagoon, Hawai’i. Photo: John Bilderback

Labor of Love

By Ben Wilkinson   |   Jun 17, 2019 June 17, 2019

Restoring a traditional Hawaiian koa canoe. Ka Wahine u‘i O Hale‘iwa, which roughly translates to “Beautiful Young Woman of Hale‘iwa,” is the pride and joy of the Manu O Ke Kai Canoe Club here in Hale‘iwa on the North Shore of O‘ahu. Carved from a single koa tree, U‘i’s life… Read More

Levi Ginnis Jr. scouts the area along the Yukon River in search of moose. The hunt and the stories of Gwich'in families taking a stand to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are the main focus of the film Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee. Photo: Greg Balkin

Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee

By Madalina Preda   |   Jun 10, 2019 June 10, 2019

Indigenous communities across the United States are increasingly confronted with threats to their sovereignty and to the places they rely on for their culture and way of life. Nowhere is this threat felt more than in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We interviewed Len Necefer, PhD, founder and CEO of Colorado-based outdoor… Read More

Anne Gilbert Chase and Brittany Griffith get the beta on Alam Kuh from Iranian climbers Habibi and Sholmaz, friends and partners from Tabriz. During our time at base camp, we got to know Habibi, Sholmaz and many other Iranian climbers, who would come by our camp to welcome us to Iran and the Alborz Mountains, and to talk about climbing, life and politics. We were a fascinating anomaly, but being climbers made us break that down. Photo: Beth Wald

Finding Refuge in Iran

By Beth Wald   |   May 29, 2019 May 29, 2019

Fog from the distant Caspian Sea swirled around us as we left the road, crossed a narrow mountain stream on a rickety footbridge of wornwooden planks, passed a pungent corral full of dank, scruffy sheep, and started the steep climb to Alam Kuh base camp in the Alborz mountain range… Read More

From the Fall 1984 catalog, Julie Galton and friends show off their brightly colored Baggies after rolling around in a patch of mud by the Colorado River. Photo: Chris Brown

Under the Mud

By Rachel G. Horn   |   May 14, 2019 May 14, 2019

Julie Galton hadn’t been to a Patagonia store in years when she realized she needed some new Baggies™ for her upcoming summer trip to the Colorado River with her son. But when she went to Patagonia.com to grab a few pairs, she was unexpectedly greeted by a familiar face. Hers. It was the only… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

The Van Fan

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Apr 9, 2019 April 9, 2019

Jeanie Adamson, a 50-something mom, decided to switch things up last year for spring break. When she told her son, Luke, she wanted to ski at every resort between Dallas and Lake Tahoe, he offered up his newly-renovated 1990 Dodge Ram van, Sherrod, for the job. The two of them… Read More

Sandstone features on the northern border of the Diné reservation. Photo: Ace Kvale

Why Run

By Meaghen Brown   |   Apr 5, 2019 April 5, 2019

Some time in the northern corner of the Diné reservation helps clarify why this question is so hard to answer. A girl wakes and runs toward the light, her dark hair streaming behind her as she races in the direction of the rising sun. She hears the prayers of her… Read More

The population of the High Atlas is concentrated in small villages, but it’s far more common to see donkeys and other livestock on the paths running through each. Chris Kehmeier and Leilani Bruntz take a well-trod exit near the village of Toulkine. Photo: Leslie Kehmeier

Ask Where The Mules Go

By Leilani Bruntz   |   Apr 4, 2019 April 4, 2019

Following ancient pathways in Morocco’s High Atlas Mountains. According to our local guide, Samir Ahmoudou, to travel anywhere in Morocco’s Atlas Mountains, you only need to know three Amazigh words: sow, gow, ich—“eat, sleep, drink.” Hospitality will take care of the rest. Such advice seems simple to the point of… Read More

Come to Papa. Leads gets a lift from Mom, Sherry, in 1995. Turtle Rock, Joshua Tree National Park, California. Photo: Greg Epperson

Where She Landed

By Bonnie Tsui   |   Mar 28, 2019 March 28, 2019

Jordan Leads wants everybody to know she is alive and well. When she was six months old, she had her picture taken with her family at Joshua Tree’s Turtle Rock: a baby in midair, swaddled in a puffy purple jumpsuit, thrown over a disturbingly large gap between boulders. (Her parents,… Read More

Was Meñakoz a legitimate big-wave spot? Photo: Tony Butt collection

An Englishman in Euskadi

By Tony Butt   |   Mar 11, 2019 March 11, 2019

It was November 1991. I was with two friends and we were at the beginning of a three-month surf trip around the coasts of Spain and Portugal. Mundaka was our starting point. We all agreed that we would be happy just to get something better than the cold, windblown beach… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Novel Inspiration

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Feb 15, 2019 February 15, 2019

After falling in love with John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Charlie Turnbull and Leon Morton set out to recreate the 1,615-mile journey described in the novel – but on bikes. In July. With camera gear and a few buddies in tow, they followed historic Route 66 from Oklahoma to Southern… Read More

Illustration: Walker Cahall

Mountain Hollow Dreams

By The Dirtbag Diaries   |   Feb 11, 2019 February 11, 2019

“I’d built it up in my head a lot—being a professional climber. This felt like the consummation of those dreams. I found the valley, I envisioned the trip, I got the funding, made it happen, stood at the base, picked the line, climbed it, sent, we were at the top… Read More

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