The Cleanest Line

Activism

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A Facebook post incites an IRL response by the citizens of Mendoza, Argentina’s wine country. The protests led to 80,000 signatures in support of the draft bills to ban fracking—and seven anti-fracking draft laws before the Argentine congress. Photo: via EcoLeaks

The First Eco-Leak

By Christopher Ketcham   |   Feb 13, 2019 February 13, 2019

In March 2018, using nothing more than a Facebook page and a rudimentary website, a 33-year-old Argentine-American biologist named Esteban Servat launched a protest that has mobilized tens of thousands of people in Argentina. Servat published a secret Argentine government study of the environmental effects of fracking in the mountainous… Read More

Honored by Grove, Manley and Oliver as “the Old Friend,” this 8- to 10-foot bristlecone stands ragged without the protection of other trees nearby, most of its roots above  ground. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Trespassing

By Garrett Grove   |   Feb 6, 2019 February 6, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds 
 from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Core

By Taro Tamai   |   Feb 5, 2019 February 5, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Mars can wait. A sunset view of part of Massy’s farm, Severn Park, is a reminder that earthen beauty is a fringe benefit of regenerative agricultural practices. Photo: Trisha Dixon

A Blueprint for Cooling Earth

By Brad Wieners   |   Feb 4, 2019 February 4, 2019

When he was 22 and away at college, Charles Massy got a fateful shock: His father had suffered a severe heart attack, and while it wasn’t immediately fatal, it was clear his dad could no longer run the family farm back home in the Monaro region of New South Wales,… Read More

Leah Evans approaching a cedar “mother tree” at the bottom of the Womb, a slide path off Mount Macpherson near Revelstoke, British Columbia. Forest ecologist Suzanne Simard has helped us understand that mother trees send nutrients to the surrounding forest, increasing the resilience of an entire network of trees. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Homegrown

By Leah Evans   |   Jan 31, 2019 January 31, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Most trees in Japanese public spaces are highly manicured from the beginning of their life to craft a distinct aesthetic, like this intricate pine entanglement in the Yamagata Prefecture. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Film

By Molly Baker   |   Jan 29, 2019 January 29, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

The best ones aren't huggable--or so says Deb MacKillop. “As a forester, it’s handy to know the length of your limbs,” she says. “They make great measuring tools.” Leah Evans gives some love and follows Deb's example while skiing among the red cedars of interior BC. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: A Story Written in Rings

By Laura Yale   |   Nov 29, 2018 November 29, 2018

Quietly, patiently, trees endure. They are the oldest living beings we come to know during our time on earth, living bridges into our planet’s expansive past. Treeline is a film celebrating the forests on which our species has always depended—and around which some skiers and snowboarders etch their entire lives. Read More

Photo: Drew Smith

Our Urgent Gift to the Planet

By Rose Marcario, CEO   |   Nov 28, 2018 November 28, 2018

Based on last year’s irresponsible tax cut, Patagonia will owe less in taxes this year—$10 million less, in fact. Instead of putting the money back into our business, we’re responding by putting $10 million back into the planet. Our home planet needs it more than we do. Our home planet is… Read More

Protecting the Grand Canyon requires protecting everything around it. A Patagonia Action Works email rider helped GCT mobilize people across the country to defend the Grand Canyon from uranium mining. Courtesy: Grand Canyon Trust/Blake McCord

There’s More Than One Way to Give

By Jeff McElroy   |   Nov 21, 2018 November 21, 2018

For almost 40 years, Patagonia has supported grassroots efforts aimed at defending our air, water, soil and wild places. But in this time of unprecedented threats, it’s often hard to know where to start. We launched Patagonia Action Works in 2017 to connect individuals directly with our… Read More

Photo: Alex Lowther

A Historic Win in Utah Is Good News for Bears Ears

By Krista Langlois   |   Nov 19, 2018 November 19, 2018

One spring day earlier this year, Willie Grayeyes, a Diné (Navajo) elder with a serious mustache and white hair tied in a traditional bun, stopped to pick up his mail at the post office. Among the usual assortment of bills and catalogs, he found an envelope from the local government… Read More

Musk oxen have been around since the Pleistocene era; along with caribou, they are the only hoofed animals that survived the end of that era (10,000 years ago). Today, they roam the open tundra of the Arctic Refuge in search of vegetation growing under or above the snow. Photo: Florian Schulz

Speak Up Now for America’s Arctic

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Nov 1, 2018 November 1, 2018

For decades, protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from development was one thing many Republicans and Democrats in Washington could agree upon. One of the last truly wild places on Earth, the refuge is a stunning, unmatched wilderness where the Porcupine caribou calve in the spring, the… Read More

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