The Cleanest Line

Activism

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Photo: Garrett Grove

Qat’muk

By Troy Sebastian   |   Nov 22, 2016 November 22, 2016

For over 20 years, the Ktunaxa Nation has opposed the Jumbo Glacier Resort development proposed in Qat’muk, core territory of the Ktunaxa Nation and home to the grizzly bear spirit. Patagonia recognizes and affirms the Ktunaxa Nation’s responsibility to protect Qat’muk and the grizzly bear spirit through the… Read More

Members of the Porcupine caribou herd crossing the Hulahula River in the Arctic Refuge. Caribou travel in groups and migrate at different times: Pregnant females, some yearlings and barren cows are the first to travel north toward the coastal plain, followed by males and the rest of the juveniles. Photo: Florian Schulz

The Fight to Protect the Arctic Refuge Has Just Begun

By Patagonia   |   Dec 27, 2017 December 27, 2017

“Americans have voiced overwhelming support for protecting the Arctic Refuge, and the fight is far from over. If we destroy the Arctic Refuge today, we will never get that wild, unspoiled wilderness back.” —Rose Marcario, President and CEO of Patagonia On December 20, Congress passed the tax bill… Read More

Five-thirty a.m. looking good from my tent the second morning of GoWild 2018. Photo: Kirsten Van Horne

Growing Pains

By Kirsten Van Horne   |   Jul 17, 2019 July 17, 2019

 In our 1990 summer catalog we said, “It’s up to us to make sure that children don’t go tree hungry, that they have wild places and opportunities to be in them. Once they do, they will amaze us with their caring. They need not wait to grow up to be… Read More

To the barricades. A women’s march reached a police blockade on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, North Dakota, in 2016. The #NoDAPL protests focused on Indigenous rights but also the reckoning we’ll all face as the climate crisis intensifies: Do we defend oil companies—or fresh water? Photo: Colin McCarthy

The Climate Crisis Is a Human Issue

By Bill McKibben   |   Sep 16, 2019 September 16, 2019

Thirty years ago this month, I published my first book, The End of Nature, which was also the first book for a general audience about what we then called the greenhouse effect. And my main worry was about … nature. In 1989, global warming was still a… Read More

Photo: Andrew Burr

Our Common Ground

By Vincent Stanley   |   Sep 28, 2017 September 28, 2017

As Americans, regardless of our descent, we share as our greatest inheritance, both material and spiritual, the gift of our federal public lands. Most of us can readily name a piece of ground sacred to us as individuals that belongs to every soul in the country: Yosemite, the Everglades, Acadia,… Read More

Foothills of the Brooks Range in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. Photo: Austin Siadak

Where Life Begins

By Clare Gallagher   |   Oct 29, 2019 October 29, 2019

This summer, we–Clare Gallagher, Tommy Caldwell and Luke Nelson–explored, sweated, laughed and even cried in one of America’s greatest national treasures, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We learned from the Gwich’in Nation about how the coastal plains in northeastern Alaska are… Read More

Photo: Wingspan Media Productions

Free the Snake and Restore Salmon to Honor Treaty Rights

By Julian Matthews   |   Feb 3, 2017 February 3, 2017

Salmon have sustained the Nimiipuu people since time began for us. Nimiipuu means “the people” and is one amongst many names the Nez Perce call themselves. The loss of healthy numbers of salmon returning up the Columbia and Snake Rivers to our traditional lands in Idaho and Oregon, where we have… Read More

Photo: Nate Ptacek

The Boundary Waters Works for Everyone

By Adam Fetcher   |   Dec 19, 2016 December 19, 2016

Last week, federal agencies responsible for stewardship of America’s public lands did the right thing: they took a hard look at science and public opinion and made a sober decision to protect Minnesota’s iconic Boundary Waters from a sulfide-ore copper mining project by denying the renewal of two mineral leases. Read More

The enormous amount of ice that carried all these rocks over the course of hundreds of years has now melted away. Photo: Vincent Colliard

Glacier Retreat

By Léa Brassy   |   Jan 18, 2018 January 18, 2018

Experiencing places myself is the ultimate chance for imprinting the reality of them in my mind. Living for a year on a remote atoll in the Pacific allowed me to witness the seawater level rising and its consequences. Yet picturing what’s happening far across the world remains abstract for me. Read More

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