The Cleanest Line

Activism

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Photo: Amy Kumler

The Next Bentley

By Dave Rastovich   |   May 17, 2017 May 17, 2017

Australian democracy is facing a serious problem: New anti-protest laws in states around the country that are designed to advance the interests of resource companies over the rights of the community and the environment. And that’s just the start. In April 2014, near the headwaters of the Richmond River at… Read More

Photo: Michael A. Estrada

The Original Tree Huggers

By Michael A. Estrada   |   Sep 4, 2018 September 4, 2018

When you hear the term “tree hugger,” what—or who—do you see? What image, or images, pop into your head? It likely starts with the vague idea of folks who are often—and perhaps overly—passionate about protecting nature. But then, if you expand it, what do they look like? Is it a… Read More

Photo: Sean Villanueva O’Driscoll

The Real Alps

By Stéphanie Bodet   |   Jan 30, 2017 January 30, 2017

I was lucky to grow up in the valley of the Haute-Durance, located in the Hautes-Alpes not far from Briançon and the border to Italy. Home was a wild and protected area where my parents introduced me to the joys of mountain trails, skiing on beautiful slopes through evergreens and… Read More

Krissy Moehl and Grant Guise run the inaugural takayna / Tarkine ultramarathon. Photo: Jarrah Lynch

If You Love It, Run for It

By Krissy Moehl   |   Aug 13, 2019 August 13, 2019

Krissy Moehl reports from the inaugural takayna ultramarathon “There are no footprints.” Fellow Patagonia ambassador and New Zealand native Grant Guise voiced what I was thinking. Our headlamps and phone lights dimly illuminated the overgrown double-track from Rebecca Road. “If 100 people are starting a race in five minutes, we… Read More

Bob Brown is the founder of the Australian Green Party. He and his foundation have been fighting for decades to protect takayna / Tarkine. Photo: Krystle Wright

World Heritage Protection for the takayna / Tarkine

By Dr. Bob Brown   |   May 8, 2018 May 8, 2018

Nearly two centuries ago, Henry David Thoreau wrote that “In wildness is the preservation of the world.” I first went deep into the forests of northwestern Tasmania in 1973 in an unsuccessful search for the Tasmanian tiger. That wonderful creature is now accepted as extinct, but the takayna / Tarkine remains… Read More

Filleting the catch of the day. Photo: Dave McCoy

The Freedom to Live Off the Land

By Mike Wood   |   Jun 7, 2018 June 7, 2018

When I was a kid, the Connecticut River was my Yukon. I spent many days working alongside the river or canoeing its islands and backwaters in search of crabs, snapper, blues, ducks and alewives—amazing silvery fish that brave the depths of the Atlantic to feed and grow and then return… Read More

The confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers unites the past and present. It’s also the proposed site for a massive gondola. Photo: Peter McBride

Conserving Silence

By Kevin Fedarko & Peter McBride   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

As gorgeous as the Grand Canyon is to look upon, its greatest gifts may not be visual. “On any given evening in summer, but most notably in late June, there comes a moment just after the sun has disappeared behind the rimrock, and just before the darkness has tumbled down… Read More

Photo: Emmie Theberge

In the Shadows of Katahdin

By Ryan Parker   |   Jun 30, 2017 June 30, 2017

I break trail for my companions, pushing through snow and curtains of my own misty breath, both aglow with starlight. We left warmth and merriment in Big Spring Brook Hut where the rest of our group is gathered. Only three of us pushed on after the 11-mile ski from the… Read More

Photo: Fawn Talmon

The Last Straw

By Timmy O’Neill   |   Jul 5, 2017 July 5, 2017

In mid-May, I presented at the annual NOLS instructor conference held in Lander, Wyoming. This was not only an opportunity to speak to the frontline of outdoor educators but, in light of the recent concerns with our public lands, an even better… Read More

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