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Yosemite Valley moments before rangers were forced to evacuate the park due to the Ferguson fire. Photo: Eric Bissell

Endless Fire Season

By Austin Murphy   |   Oct 29, 2018 October 29, 2018

On a Wednesday in August, I drove three hours from the Bay Area to Mariposa, California, on the doorstep of Yosemite National Park. For me, this is typically a drive of mounting anticipation—of stoke. Cresting Altamont Pass on Interstate 580, crossing the Central Valley, what I felt instead was dread. Read More

Photo: Bob Wick/Bureau of Land Management

Why Should the Public Care About Public Lands?

By Hans Cole   |   Jul 6, 2017 July 6, 2017

Debates over how America’s public lands should be managed are as old as the system itself, dating back to the early 1900s when President Teddy Roosevelt pioneered our current system. Disagreements have often centered on the balance between energy or resource development and protecting wild places for recreation and wildlife. Read More

Most trees in Japanese public spaces are highly manicured from the beginning of their life to craft a distinct aesthetic, like this intricate pine entanglement in the Yamagata Prefecture. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Film

By Molly Baker   |   Jan 29, 2019 January 29, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

Telling the Dam Truth

By Yvon Chouinard   |   Apr 9, 2018 April 9, 2018

Europe’s last remaining wild rivers are at grave risk. This time the danger isn’t coming from excessive drought or factories dumping toxic waste—it’s coming from the very hydropower dams that claim to bring us clean, green, renewable energy. The fact is, dams are dirty—and their destructive impact far outweighs their… Read More

The biointensive garden at Parque Patagonia in summer, from above. More than 30 different crops in an orchestra of flavors. Photo: James Q Martin

The Garden at the End of the World

By Javier Soler   |   Sep 11, 2018 September 11, 2018

If the present status-quo of soil loss, carbon pollution and planetary warming continue, we’re looking at just 60 more harvests before we can no longer grow 95 percent of the food we humans rely upon to live. At the same time, the way to prevent this calamity is at hand:… Read More

Photo: Matt Van Biene

A Letter-Writing Party to Protect Bears Ears

By Matty Van Biene   |   Oct 20, 2016 October 20, 2016

Editor’s note: Tommy Caldwell appeared in a video for social media, Matty Van Biene hosted a letter-writing party, Josh Ewing works for a nonprofit group—the ways to help Bears Ears are many but the time to act is now. The Bears Ears Coalition is seeking permanent protection for this magical region… Read More

Mars can wait. A sunset view of part of Massy’s farm, Severn Park, is a reminder that earthen beauty is a fringe benefit of regenerative agricultural practices. Photo: Trisha Dixon

A Blueprint for Cooling Earth

By Brad Wieners   |   Feb 4, 2019 February 4, 2019

When he was 22 and away at college, Charles Massy got a fateful shock: His father had suffered a severe heart attack, and while it wasn’t immediately fatal, it was clear his dad could no longer run the family farm back home in the Monaro region of New South Wales,… Read More

There is Trump and There is the Truth

There is Trump and There is the Truth

By Corley Kenna   |   Dec 5, 2017 December 5, 2017

Yesterday, the president didn’t just reduce the boundaries of your public lands. He revoked two national monuments. No president has ever done that before. It is widely unpopular and unprecedented. It is also illegal, and Patagonia will be challenging his action in court. The president also lied. Here is a… Read More

The first wildlife overpass put in on the People’s Way Partnership project along Highway 93 in Montana. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes declared that the highway was a visitor on the landscape and any future improvements needed to consider the need of wildlife first. In this spirit, the tribes worked closely with the Montana Department of Transportation and created the densest collection of wildlife crossing structures in North America. Bears, deer, elk, bobcats and others are already using the structures. Photo: Steven Gnam

A Measure of Hope

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Jul 16, 2019 July 16, 2019

As the great Aldo Leopold once said, harmony with the land and with wildlife “is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.” Yet here we are: humankind is now the singular driving force behind the potential extinction of more than one… Read More

Musk oxen have been around since the Pleistocene era; along with caribou, they are the only hoofed animals that survived the end of that era (10,000 years ago). Today, they roam the open tundra of the Arctic Refuge in search of vegetation growing under or above the snow. Photo: Florian Schulz

Speak Up Now for America’s Arctic

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Nov 1, 2018 November 1, 2018

For decades, protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge from development was one thing many Republicans and Democrats in Washington could agree upon. One of the last truly wild places on Earth, the refuge is a stunning, unmatched wilderness where the Porcupine caribou calve in the spring, the… Read More

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