The Cleanest Line

Activism

Levi Ginnis Jr. scouts the area along the Yukon River in search of moose. The hunt and the stories of Gwich'in families taking a stand to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are the main focus of the film Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee. Photo: Greg Balkin

Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee

By Madalina Preda   |   Jun 10, 2019 June 10, 2019

Indigenous communities across the United States are increasingly confronted with threats to their sovereignty and to the places they rely on for their culture and way of life. Nowhere is this threat felt more than in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We interviewed Len Necefer, PhD, founder and CEO of Colorado-based outdoor… Read More

Phones and social media were instrumental to the organizers of the Youth Climate Strike US who learned about climate change by doing research online and used social media to mobilize tens of thousands of like-minded kids across the country. From left to right: Maddy Fernands, 15, Isra Hirsi, 16, Karla Stephan, 14, (top right) and Nadia Nazar, 16, all organizers of the strike in Washington, D.C. Photo: Matt Eich

The Last Generation

By Prince Shakur   |   May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019

On March 15, spirits are high among a group of friends in Washington, D.C. Isra Hirsi, 16, Haven Coleman, 13, and other teen girls sprint to the lawn of the Capitol Building after a morning meeting at a nearby cafe. They laugh as they walk and chant, “Whose planet? Our… Read More

Illustration: Mortis Studio

Stop New Offshore Drilling

By Patagonia   |   Apr 15, 2019 April 15, 2019

The Trump administration wants to open almost all of America’s coastline to the oil industry, putting our beaches and oceans at serious risk. Fifty years ago, an offshore rig spilled 100,000 barrels of crude oil into California’s Santa Barbara Channel, creating a 35-mile slick that fouled the… Read More

Among the sacred sites Bears Ears National Monument is intended to preserve are these Pueblo cliff dwellings and granaries (for storing maize) on Comb Ridge, Utah. Photo: Josh Ewing

Hey, How’s That Lawsuit Against the President Going?

By Patagonia   |   Apr 9, 2019 April 9, 2019

Glad you asked … and if you aren’t already aware, in December 2017, President Trump issued a proclamation slashing Utah’s Bears Ears National Monument by 85 percent and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, 100 miles to the west of Bears Ears, by half. In an unprecedented response, we joined… Read More

Tongass National Forest, Alaska. Photo: Amy Gulick

The Shutdown Isn’t Over

By Elliott Woods   |   Mar 15, 2019 March 15, 2019

For 34 days in December and January, the government shutdown not only impaired the livelihoods of 800,000 federal employees, it brought almost the entire federal scientific apparatus to a halt. Worse, there are indicators that the Trump administration willingly took advantage of the shutdown to expedite strategic projects in the… Read More

In business to save our home planet, Patagonia owner/founder Yvon Chouinard. Photo: Jimmy Chin

What’s at Stake Is the Future of Humankind

By Patagonia   |   Mar 14, 2019 March 14, 2019

“Forget Mars,” Yvon Chouinard said recently—although, come to think of it, he might have used a stronger f-word. Our founder was responding to a glib idea that comes up from time to time in conversations about the climate crisis—that if we exhaust the Earth as a habitat for humans, we’ll… Read More

Alexandria started striking against climate inaction on December 14, 2018. She was inspired by Greta Thunberg’s Friday protests in front of the Swedish Parliament. She usually sits on this bench nearby the UN Headquarters in New York City with her two signs. “Most people pass me by, but some stop and ask me to tell them about my signs. One Swedish girl saw me one day and said she knew Greta and the student strike movement. We took a photo and she cried.” Photo: Joel Caldwell

Adults, Change Is Coming Whether You Like It or Not

By Alexandria Villaseñor   |   Mar 11, 2019 March 11, 2019

Alexandria Villaseñor is a 13-year-old climate justice activist and one of three lead organizers, together with Isra Hirsi and Haven Coleman, of US Youth Climate Strike. She is part of a global movement of students who are striking from school to protest inaction on climate change. The global… Read More

The confluence of the Little Colorado and Colorado Rivers unites the past and present. It’s also the proposed site for a massive gondola. Photo: Peter McBride

Conserving Silence

By Kevin Fedarko & Peter McBride   |   Mar 6, 2019 March 6, 2019

As gorgeous as the Grand Canyon is to look upon, its greatest gifts may not be visual. “On any given evening in summer, but most notably in late June, there comes a moment just after the sun has disappeared behind the rimrock, and just before the darkness has tumbled down… Read More

A Facebook post incites an IRL response by the citizens of Mendoza, Argentina’s wine country. The protests led to 80,000 signatures in support of the draft bills to ban fracking—and seven anti-fracking draft laws before the Argentine congress. Photo: via EcoLeaks

The First Eco-Leak

By Christopher Ketcham   |   Feb 13, 2019 February 13, 2019

In March 2018, using nothing more than a Facebook page and a rudimentary website, a 33-year-old Argentine-American biologist named Esteban Servat launched a protest that has mobilized tens of thousands of people in Argentina. Servat published a secret Argentine government study of the environmental effects of fracking in the mountainous… Read More

Honored by Grove, Manley and Oliver as “the Old Friend,” this 8- to 10-foot bristlecone stands ragged without the protection of other trees nearby, most of its roots above  ground. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: Trespassing

By Garrett Grove   |   Feb 6, 2019 February 6, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

This Cryptomeria corridor near the Togakushi Shrine in Nagano Prefecture pulls tree-seeking crowds 
 from Tokyo to walk through towering Japanese red-cedar, pay their respects to nature and ask for the protection of something in their lives. Honshu, Japan. Photo: Garrett Grove

Treeline: The Core

By Taro Tamai   |   Feb 5, 2019 February 5, 2019

When we move through the forest in winter, we’re often left wonderstruck by snow-shrouded trees bent and morphed from years of wear in silent solitude. Their depth of character becomes evident as we weave ourselves into their lives and ecosystems. But we often tell our stories and not theirs. Our… Read More

LOADING
ERROR