The Cleanest Line

Activism

“Somehow, the desert would always remain in the recesses of my mind—that project I’d get to the next season, that crack we scoped that we needed to get anchors on or sometimes just that meditation and erasing of anything from the past or present.” -Luke Mehall, The Desert. Photo: Greg Cairns

The Magic of the Desert

By Luke Mehall   |   Aug 23, 2019 August 23, 2019

The creation of Bears Ears National Monument was something that seemed more inevitable in the summer of 2016. It seems like now it’s one of those things where you’re on one side or the other because after all, I’m writing this book in the Trump years, and… Read More

The Elwha River has been dam-free for less than two decades  whereas the Hoh River—running from the flanks of Mount Olympus to the Pacific Ocean on the Olympic Peninsula’s western edge—remains one of the state’s few uninterrupted rivers, largely due to its location in Olympic National Park. Photo: Colin Wiseman

Saving One River: Hoh Steelhead in Decline

By Colin Wiseman   |   Aug 17, 2019 August 17, 2019

“Nature provides a free lunch, but only if we control our appetites.” —William Ruckelshaus, first administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency A coho salmon the size of my pinky drifts quietly in the shade. It’s hardly distinguishable from the sand below. But Marie-France Roy, a professional… Read More

This illustration by Matt Blease appears in full in the Patagonia August 2019 Gear Guide.

Recycling Is Broken. Now What?

By Michele Bianchi   |   Aug 14, 2019 August 14, 2019

Patagonia is no stranger to the difficulty of throwing stuff away. We take back 100 percent of the gear you return for recycling through our Worn Wear program. In 2018, we recycled 6,797 pounds of products. But we can’t recycle or repair everything you send us. Some… Read More

Krissy Moehl and Grant Guise run the inaugural takayna / Tarkine ultramarathon. Photo: Jarrah Lynch

If You Love It, Run for It

By Krissy Moehl   |   Aug 13, 2019 August 13, 2019

Krissy Moehl reports from the inaugural takayna ultramarathon “There are no footprints.” Fellow Patagonia ambassador and New Zealand native Grant Guise voiced what I was thinking. Our headlamps and phone lights dimly illuminated the overgrown double-track from Rebecca Road. “If 100 people are starting a race in five minutes, we… Read More

Built in 1959, the Idbar Dam cracked soon after its construction. Investors and construction crews had ignored multiple warnings from the locals not to underestimate the force of the Bašćica, a river known to be unpredictable and fast-flowing. Idbar was decommissioned soon after it was constructed, when the river began fracturing the dam, allowing the Bašćica to flow freely again. Konjic, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Andrew Burr

One Year for the Blue Heart of Europe

By Lisa Rose   |   Jun 20, 2019 June 20, 2019

The Vjosa River flows 270 kilometers without barriers from the Pindus Mountains to the Adriatic Sea. It’s one of many rivers in the Balkans that are under threat by a tidal wave of more than 2,800 new hydropower dam projects. In March 2018, Patagonia joined grassroots groups and regional community… Read More

Five-thirty a.m. looking good from my tent the second morning of GoWild 2018. Photo: Kirsten Van Horne

Growing Pains

By Kirsten Van Horne   |   Jul 17, 2019 July 17, 2019

 In our 1990 summer catalog we said, “It’s up to us to make sure that children don’t go tree hungry, that they have wild places and opportunities to be in them. Once they do, they will amaze us with their caring. They need not wait to grow up to be… Read More

The first wildlife overpass put in on the People’s Way Partnership project along Highway 93 in Montana. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes declared that the highway was a visitor on the landscape and any future improvements needed to consider the need of wildlife first. In this spirit, the tribes worked closely with the Montana Department of Transportation and created the densest collection of wildlife crossing structures in North America. Bears, deer, elk, bobcats and others are already using the structures. Photo: Steven Gnam

A Measure of Hope

By Senator Tom Udall   |   Jul 16, 2019 July 16, 2019

As the great Aldo Leopold once said, harmony with the land and with wildlife “is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.” Yet here we are: humankind is now the singular driving force behind the potential extinction of more than one… Read More

Instead of feeding on whitebark pine nuts and army cutworm moths in the alpine country, grizzlies are beginning to stay low in Montana’s Mission Valley throughout summer and into fall gorging themselves on the abundant crops planted at the base of the mountains. Courtesy Bryce Andrews

Grizzlies in August

By Bryce Andrews   |   Jul 3, 2019 July 3, 2019

This was the rule of late summer in Montana’s Mission Valley: During the day, the landscape belonged to humans. Tractors worked the fields, and children played carefree in the yards. People swam in shady eddies and picnicked beside the creeks. At night, the bears came out. Stretching in the cooling… Read More

Barreling rights at King Island’s unspoiled Martha Lavinia Beach. The construction of a largescale fish 
 arm just offshore would immediately degrade this intact ecosystem—and likely impact the perfect peaks of Martha’s. Photo: Ted Grambeau

Worth Protecting

By Sean Doherty   |   Jun 28, 2019 June 28, 2019

Standing Up Against Industrial Fish Farming That Would Forever Alter A Unique Australian Beachbreak The day we arrived on King Island we drove out to Martha Lavinia Beach, where we stood in the dunes and watched waves running down the beach—long left-handers breaking so fast they were almost impossible to… Read More

Levi Ginnis Jr. scouts the area along the Yukon River in search of moose. The hunt and the stories of Gwich'in families taking a stand to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are the main focus of the film Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee. Photo: Greg Balkin

Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee

By Madalina Preda   |   Jun 10, 2019 June 10, 2019

Indigenous communities across the United States are increasingly confronted with threats to their sovereignty and to the places they rely on for their culture and way of life. Nowhere is this threat felt more than in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. We interviewed Len Necefer, PhD, founder and CEO of Colorado-based outdoor… Read More

Phones and social media were instrumental to the organizers of the Youth Climate Strike US who learned about climate change by doing research online and used social media to mobilize tens of thousands of like-minded kids across the country. From left to right: Maddy Fernands, 15, Isra Hirsi, 16, Karla Stephan, 14, (top right) and Nadia Nazar, 16, all organizers of the strike in Washington, D.C. Photo: Matt Eich

The Last Generation

By Prince Shakur   |   May 1, 2019 May 1, 2019

On March 15, spirits are high among a group of friends in Washington, D.C. Isra Hirsi, 16, Haven Coleman, 13, and other teen girls sprint to the lawn of the Capitol Building after a morning meeting at a nearby cafe. They laugh as they walk and chant, “Whose planet? Our… Read More

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